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20130120
20130120
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
attempt to assassinate lincoln. and of course franklin roosevelt inaugurated in 1933 at the depths of the great depression and yet he's still able to inspire and uplift the american people to expect something new and something better. >> right, and i've heard a lot of people bantering this about. i mean, inaugurations aren't cheap. they do cost money. we do raise some private funds. lot of private funds through the inaugural committees, but we're looking at maybe $50 million at least. and some people have said, look, this is a second term. why do we need an inauguration? dot swearing in and move on. >> i think that's wrong, wrong, wrong. the price we pay as taxpayers is a small one. most of the money is raised privately. look, we don't have kings and queens in america, right? >> right. >> we don't have nobility. we have this one great tradition of the inauguration and the inaugural address, which george washington started. that's not in the constitution. it's the one time we come together and celebrate our democracy. we've now had over 200 years of stable democracy and the peaceful
hoover, franklin roosevelt's, which was signed by his wife, harry truman, dwight eisenhower, john kennedy, richard nixon, gerald ford, to be carter, ronald reagan, george bush and so on. more recently, george w. bush and barack obama. the tradition has been maintained. at some point, when a new president is elected, st. john's makes an effort to contact that and have them sign this very historic book, which is a very dear item to the church. it does not sit in the president's piu anymore but it is one of those great pieces of history long associated with this church from 1856 to the present. one of the little-known facts about presidential inaugurations is that it has been the custom in modern times to have a church service, a worship service of some kind before the president takes the oath of office. a lot of people feel that is something of a longstanding tradition, and it's not. it actually began with franklin roosevelt on march 4, 1943, when he wished to have a worship service take place before he took the zero art -- before he took the oath of office in the depths of the great depres
tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this is not the opportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. it decided to move the inauguration today in front of the capital. could he do that? he did. the joint inaugural committee was not happy with that decision. the president of united states can decide above and beyond the date and time they're being sworn in, among other things. we move them from the east front to the west front. the crowd had been getting bigger and bigger. one reason to have them on the west front is because you could accommodate more people. if you look to the photographs of the last several inauguration's, you can measure the crowd by how far it goes back. when ronald reagan was the first sworn in, the crowd went back to maybe a block beyond the reflecting pool. with each inauguration, the crowd gets fu
, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are spared, the less they try do the usually better they stand up. >> do you agree, less is more is this. >> yeah. and shorter is better. that helps. when richard nixon was wrikts his second inaugural, he look
, in 1905, was the first president to draw massive crowds. but, in 1945, franklin roosevelt called off the big party when world war two was raging. historian douglas brinkley. >> "but that was a very unique year, 1945, and most normal situations, even if we're in a recession or we're in a foreign war we still throw pretty big inaugurals." >> reporter: for maurice madden. it is mainly a big moment. >> "i do believe that if i'm blessed to live to be an old man, i'll be able to look back on all of this and say, you know, that i was part of american history and that really means a lot to me." >> reporter: a big part of his american journey. tom foreman, c-n-n, washington. >> hundreds of thousands of people will be able to witness the event. but they won't be able to share the event as easily as they would hope. >> it looks like it is going to be a bit more mild than it was four years ago. partly to mostly cloudy skies with a few late shower possibilities. clear skies and relatively mild. 50s. has to go through tonight and after midnight temperatures will be dropping into the 30's. 20's. th
. franklin roosevelt had to long-term affairs. from the missy the hand, marguerite is a personal aide in secretary and coat and dress their and undress her. they, too. but if we found out about fdr's misbehavior one of which are fdr out of office and demanded his visit nation economy was recovering? on way back to the french and indian war. the young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. name is sally fairfax, an attractive, older sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian war for the revolutionary war, much as petraeus is enough to team public and what we got rid george washington? bill clinton is not the first and the worst. and there, done that, a long history of it. it pains me to say even abraham lincoln visited a. say it isn't so, but it happened. the details on matters itchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this, but lincoln's best friend was joshua speed and speed was perhaps as dashing and from unlucky with the ladies as lincoln was homely and awkward unlucky
as they did about clinton fatigue and bush fatigue and reagan fatigue. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. wetoday's modern age, could have more than two terms for any president? you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. his state of the union address. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action
wants. franklin roosevelt in 1937 got in the biggest landslide in presidential history. the congress was more democratic than it had been in that century, has ever been since then, yet he saw the supreme court overruling program after program of his so he decided to come back and ask congress to be able to pack the courts with justices of his own choosing. they slapped it down, had a lot to do with that being a miserable term nap's what barack obama was talking about when he said overreach. >> james, i'm curious about potential powder kegs here. without thinking about things like natural disasters that could come along, what are things that you see as potentially plaguing this second term? does the arab spring and some negative fallout from that terrorism, anything else just -- >> bypass the natural disaster piece so quickly because i think that climb change is something that is not as random as we think it is. so this administration, because i think it owes it to the folk who put them in place, has to be knowledgeable about how our environment is going to unfold in the next several
that circle. but i think as his term went on he was reading about franklin roosevelt, teld di roosevelt. i think there's a sense when the problems change the president that you look back to changes as well. otherwise, we historians would be useful if we didn't help other know what i mean the future. >> one example of this in history is that lincoln at the beginning of his presidency idolized george washington, thought a lot about him, but as the problems got more difficult, as he became in certain ways more radical he was much more interested in people like thomas jefferson. there is that evolution. >> so is there a concern that this president expressed when you had that intimate dinner about looking at history and where other presidents went wrong? >> i think most presidents know that in this off the record dinner. we won't go into a sort of a transcript, but i think you can see very much in terms of what he says in public and what he does that this is someone who, for instance, if you talk about lyndon johnson and the war in vietnam he not only know what is people are talking about but t
historian, he will have taken four oaths, puts him at the same league at fdr. >> that is right. franklin roosevelt took the oath four times and bit of a fluke for a president who is limited to two terms to take it four times. that is what happens when you have it last time and repeat it and, of course, we had january 20th fall on sunday which is private ceremony today. >> eric: you have written about the resolution and founding fathers. what do you think they would say if they came back and turn the tv and watched what is going to happen tomorrow? >> i think they would be thrilled that so many american people can watch the peaceful transfer of power under the u.s. constitution. that is really what an inauguration is all about. >> eric: george washington wore ra brown suited and white silk stockings, and he had a sword. can you imagine if the president came out with a sword? and it was the same sense of history and love of our country that has continued through all these years? >> yes, the love of country and patriotism, things are different but obviously washington's first inaugural was
. barry pederson will have our cover story. >> i franklin delano roosevelt... >> reporter: 43 men have held the office of president, but only a handful seem to stand out in history's rear view mirror. >> washington, lincoln. reporter: every historian has a list of favorites. >> they had courage. and they had integrity. >> reporter: the presidents who were our greatest leaders and why. later on sunday morning. >> osgood: a presidential limosine it is not but a brand new version of a much belovedded sports car promised fast company for those with a taste of style and speed. lee cowan will be taking us for a test drive. >> reporter: some are describing chevy's new corvette as pure sex. the new sting ray is sleeker, faster and has lines that have some already lining up to get one. >> you're the first outside person. >> am i really? to sit in one of these. reporter: the latest generation of an american icon later on sunday morning. >> osgood: warren buffet is something of an american icon himself. multibillionaire who lives unpretentiously a long way from wall street. this morning rebecca j
to talking films. was on wall street during the boom and bust. worked as part of the franklin roosevelt campaign team, was the first chairman of the securities and exchange commission, the first chairman of the maritime commission, the first irish-american to be ambassador to the court of st. james, to great britain. and the father of a president, and attorney general, a senator, the woman who did more to the mentally disabled in this country, in this world than anyone else, and who will, 100 years from now, be as well-known as her brothers i think. and the youngest, the ambassador to ireland who was instrumental in arranging peace, and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in united states. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of a man who spent his life moving back and forth from outsider to insider, from outsider to insider. it is the story of an irish catholic who was not ashamed of his heritage, but refused to be defined by it. he was a third generation immigrants. his parents had been born in the united states. his grandparents had come here when the
it a second time so now a third time, tomorrow a fourth time. you'd thing it was franklin roosevelt. >> he is president. >> that's right. he had practiced so many times for that moment. we know how he felt. so, matt, tomorrow, what will you be looking for? what's the first thing you want to be -- you want to make sure you're sitting and watching. >> i think the first thing you watch for when both the president and the first lady come out of church. we sort of get the first glimpse as they do that but in the end what we all want to hear what's going to be in his inaugural address, how will he address a country incredibly divided and went through a rough and tumble campaign cycle and struggles in congress. what is he going to say to congress and the country? many inaugurals have gone down very well. some have not been well. >> abc's jon karl covers the white house and the president for us and, of course, we all are waiting for that inaugural address, but coming up to this inauguration day, the president struck quite a confrontational tone with congress. >> reporter: he sure has. also feels p
of office four times as president, franklin roosevelt. >> he was elected four times. >> obama doesn't get to be president for that long. >> bunt this up. when we redid it four years ago, a couple days later, accident have to do it but they just did it just to be on the safe side is that why? >> here's why politics come into t as they thought about whether to redo the oath, they were thinking, look, this is a president who's been accused of not being born in the united states. people are really looking for reasons to question his authentici authenticity. so they thought, look, let's get rid of this problem at the beginning. let's redo the oath there is the photograph there in the mac room in the white house, done at 7:00 in the evening on january 21st and they eliminated the problem but one of the reasons they felt to deal with the problem is they felt his political opposition, they might file a lawsuit they would be in court. they didn't want to have that sort of uncertainty. >> did it, got over with and that is that he will be in the blue room today administering the oath at the white ho
. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggressive speak. he was speaking to the whole country, but he was not in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way. of course, eisenhower never sounded like that. >> that speech is recognized as one of the better second inaugurals. i think it does echoes some of the themes of obama, president obama. one of back and look the lines in that speech is, i see a nation ill-clothed -- one-third of the nation. he talked about in
. franklin roosevelt only gave 30 fireside chats in 12 years. he understood instinctively the dangers of overexposure. he also controlled the media to an extent that modern presidents could not hope to. host: looking back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i h
a kind of speech that franklin roosevelt did which he has studied for his second inaugural which was a pretty tough speech. >> and what's the first test in your view, john? whether the president -- he'll talk bipartisanship tomorrow, but will he act bipartisan? >> i mean, it's fascinating because some of the proposals he's made that have already come under fire, for example, reporting republican chuck hagel as secretary of defense has not gone over well with republicans, especially the neoconservative crowd. so that outreach which traditionally would be bridge building has actually in this environment created a lot of blowback. and the question is whether policy moves like immigration reform, can they really cobble together any kind of bipartisan coalition? bush backed it, but will it now mean republicans support it? >> when we're talking with melody barnes, does he pick gun control or immigration? gun control being an issue that's highly polarized. immigration where you've got marko ruma marco rubio with ideas that jibe with the president. >> the thing about immigration, all dem
this. she became a liberal spokesperson for the roosevelt family. when franklin roosevelt couldn't go as far as he wanted to, he would say, listen to my wife and that's where my heart lies. in another case where it can backfire hillary clinton in the first clinton administration. >> a crucial role michelle obama played giving that speech which was very well received. >> she helps to humanize him and provide that behind had scenes look at who he is and what he's trying to accomplish. she can relate to people on a level of shared experiences. she's a working woman. she understands raising kids and juggling work and family. and when people can hear from her in that sort of long form format and really have that conversation with her, it really electroifies the room and i think that's what helped changed the dialogue in 2008. >> in that speech that she gave at the convention, i think people forgot, you know, democrats were really a little bit down. she got out there and when she spoke, that wasn't just one of the best speeches of a first lady, that was one of the best speeches in american
. in a few hours. >> chris: franklin roosevelt started the custom and st. john's, across lafayette square from the white house has been linked to presidents almost two centuries. >> it has a special place, because as everyone says, location, location, location... >> chris: who was the first president to worship here. >> james madison, the first president when the church was finished in 1816. >> chris: how many presidents have worshipped here, since then. >> every one. >> chris: during the civil war lincoln worshipped at st. john's on sunday evenings. >> president lincoln would come after the service had started, sit in the very back pew of the church. >> chris: back there. >> in the very back of the church and he didn't want to deserve the congregation while they were worshipping, so he came late and left early. >> chris: but madison sat in the middle of the church in pew 54. and that has become the president's pew. >> when word gets out that the president is coming to worship you almost feel like the church will tilt over on one side because so many people are on that one side. >> chris:
piece in the state dining room at the white house at the wish of franklin roosevelt. "may none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof." and i love that because you notice he puts honest first ahead of wise. >> reporter: why? because honesty is essential. reporter: to mccullough, the great presidents shared a common set of qualities. >> they had courage. and they had integrity. and they had patience. and they had determination. >> reporter: determination like teddy roosvelt who knew the panama canal would be good for american commerce and defense. helping american ships move from one ocean to the other. and he got americans to follow his vision. >> unprecedented for us to do anything like that beyond our own borders. tremendous cost. and a tremendous risk. but he then participated in decisions by going to panama to see things for himself. the first time a president ever left the country while in office. >> reporter: and the best lead not only with actions but with words. >> the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> one speech could change history. >> mr. gorba
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
anyone any. only franklin roosevelt has been sworn in four times before in the united states history. and roosevelt is elected. and inspect the future. >> you saw the live picture. we saw the president with his wife. his two children and supreme court justice john roberts. the one who is officiate fog. this is a private inauguration. and the official much larger one is happening tomorrow. tori campbell is outside and covering both of those for us. it is only the seventh tomb in history that a president has to do the private swearing in ceremony because the constitution requires they be sworn in before noon. and it happened efficiently. it has to happen by noon. as he is now inaugurated and the official one will start tomorrow. >> we look at the exterior shot from the white house. you must think. and will he bring up of popular issues and we have the state of union coming up naylor february 12th. will he steer and quite difficult visive right now out of the christmas break and what was going on in congress. and we will see. what the president has to say tomorrow. it will be interestin
, not tyranny, a president, not a king. and the first step of the president, the oath of office. >> i franklin, del nor roosevelt, do somlely swear i. i george walker bush. >> do solemnly swear. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> it's been taken over each president, usually over a bible with the eyes of the world watching. >> the office is the honor and the responsibility that is bestowed upon one individual to protect the united states, to protect the citizens of the united states, to honor the ideals of the constitution. >> george washington first added so help me god to the oath, a tradition president obammal continue as he takes that pledge once more on abraham lincoln's bible. our first president made a 250 mile journey on horseback and the nation celebrated a new dawn. >> this was the passing of power to a man who could have been king, but refused it. and then each successive inauguration was a celebration, even to today, to obama's inauguration, it's a celebration of that fact that twee didn't make our chief executive king. he wouldn't be a kick. he would pass it on. >> we
with the first one you have noted for us, involves franklin delano roosevelt. >> let's listen. >> my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into-- >> and that's interesting, because there was 1933 at the depression was on everybody's mind and everybody was afraid, so, what does he talk about? fear. >> it's a great speech in the sense he didn't get into policy prescriptions, he wasn't going to say i'm going to do this or i'm going to do that. or i have a 20-point plan. he spent the whole speech talking about the fact we need to get a steely resolve and see it through and talked about fear and said that's the only thing to fear, it's not about the future, we're going to be fine. one of the classics. >> steve: meanwhile, let's take a look at john f. kennedy's inaugural back in the '60s. >> our country and all who serve it, and the globe from that-- and truly like the world and so, my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. and
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)